Social Media & Fitness – How We Helped a Health & Fitness Facebook Page Reach over 200,000 People

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in Blog, Case studies | 0 comments

Social Media & Fitness – How We Helped a Health & Fitness Facebook Page Reach over 200,000 People

Can social media help people achieve their health and fitness goals?

This is a question we already explored with our social media for gyms campaign. But it’s one thing to use Twitter to encourage people to join a gym. This time, the challenge was to use Facebook to encourage people to attend exercise classes.

24 Fit is a Derby-based fitness group that puts on about 30 exercise classes a week.

In early 2017 they planned to launch a number of new classes in a number of new venues. They approached us in late 2016 with a relatively simple brief – to use Facebook to generate awareness of these new classes.

A good metric by which to measure the influence of a Facebook page is through the number of people who saw the page content (known as “reach”).

When we took over the management of 24 Fit Derby’s Facebook page, it had a weekly reach of around 200.

In just six weeks, we’d boosted this weekly reach to over 200,000. We also generated over 200 link clicks and increased the page likes by over 100:

Social Media Fitness

Our Strategy – Get People Excited

Our first step was to check 24 Fit Derby’s Facebook Insights to see when their fans were most active. We found there to be spikes of activity at 9:00am, 5:00pm, 7:00pm, and 9:00pm, so we decided to post four times a day during these periods of peak activity.

Next, we created Facebook events for all of the upcoming classes that 24 Fit wished to fill. There were three benefits to doing this:

1) It created a comprehensive timetable of classes on the group’s increasingly-popular Facebook page.

2) It gave anyone interested in attending all the information they needed, along with a place where they could ask any additional questions.

3) It ensured that anyone who registered their interest in each event would receive regular notifications in advance, increasing the likelihood they’d attend.

With our ideal posting times in place, and with our calendar of events sorted, the next step was to do all we could to get people engaged and excited on Facebook.

What Sort of Posts Work Best on Facebook?

24 Fit shared a huge amount of photos and videos with us, so we had plenty of content to work with. We also attended and filmed a few classes ourselves, one of which we streamed live.

It soon became clear that when it comes to boosting reach and engagement on Facebook, nothing is more effective than video.

Social Media Fitness

Social Media Fitness

Social Media Fitness

Social Media Fitness

We posted at least one video a day, with captions that were carefully crafted to encourage engagement. We used an energetic and effusive tone.

Whenever anyone commented on our posts, we answered them as quickly as possible. Even when they weren’t asking a direct question, we’d still make a point of acknowledging their input.

This sent a message to Facebook that this was an active and popular page, and it’s possible that the algorithm reacted accordingly: The more people engaged, and the more we interacted, the more people our posts reached.

If a post was performing particularly well, we’d boost it. By paying a small amount, we grew the reach by thousands.

The Results – A Phenomenally Popular Facebook Page

Things took off quickly. The following screenshots demonstrate how 24 Fit Derby’s Facebook page grew on a daily basis in just one week in early January. Pay particular attention to the reach, which by the end of the week had grown by 2,877%:

Facebook Stats 3 Jan - 24 Fit Derby Social Media Fitness

3rd Jan, 2017

 

Facebook Stats 4 Jan - 24 Fit Derby Social Media Fitness

4th Jan, 2017

 

Facebook Stats 5 Jan - 24 Fit Derby Social Media Fitness

5 Jan, 2017

 

Facebook Stats 6 Jan - 24 Fit Derby Social Media Fitness

6 Jan, 2017

 

Facebook Stats 9 Jan - 24 Fit Derby Social Media Fitness

9 Jan, 2017

 

And as the post stats demonstrate, most of this reach was organic. Boosting posts certainly helped, but the reach would have been impressive enough regardless:

Facebook Post Performance - 24 Fit Derby Social Media Fitness

By the end of the campaign the page’s reach, which had peaked at 202,633, had dipped. But given that the reach stood at around 250 when we took over the account, this still represented a major boost:

Facebook Post Performance - 24 Fit Derby Social Media Fitness

So can social media help people to achieve their health and fitness goals?

This case study demonstrates that Facebook can prove extremely effective at generating awareness and kindling excitement for exercise classes.

And as we’ve proven with previous case studies, Twitter can be used to encourage people to actually sign up to these classes, or even to invest in gym memberships.

Are you a personal trainer looking to fill your timetable? Or perhaps you run a gym and you wish to boost your membership numbers.

In any case, get in touch and we’ll show you how to achieve your goals on social media.

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Free social media training – how our Charity of the Year generated £90,000 in funding

Posted by on Nov 23, 2016 in Case studies, Social media case studies | 0 comments

Free social media training – how our Charity of the Year generated £90,000 in funding

Status Social’s 2016 Charity of the Year says it has generated £90,000 in funding and has doubled its social media reach thanks to our support.

Eating disorder charity, First Steps, has been given more than £5,000 of social media consultation and support after being named Charity of the Year in December last year. Now we are looking for our 2017 Charity of the Year.

Founder and CEO of First Steps, Cathy Cleary, says our support was one of the key factors in the success of one particular bid, helping it land funding for a member of staff for three years.

“The support from Status Social has been fantastic, so apply! The application process is quite easy and you won’t regret it!” – Cathy Cleary, Founder and CEO, First Steps.

First Steps’ social media reach has on average doubled since we began working with it. Lauren Gordon runs First Steps’ Emotional Eating support project and has been through the social media strategy and training workshops run for her and her colleagues.

In this video she explains the huge impact of our training:

 

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How Social Media Made the World’s Biggest Working Quarry Exhibition Even Bigger

Posted by on Sep 13, 2016 in Blog, Case studies | 0 comments

How Social Media Made the World’s Biggest Working Quarry Exhibition Even Bigger

Hillhead is the world’s biggest working quarry exhibition. In 2016, organisers QMJ wanted to use social media to help raise awareness of the event and to drive traffic to their registration page. As QMJ’s appointed social media partners, we used Twitter and LinkedIn to connect with the target audience.

This year they saw a 7% increase on previous show’s attendance, with 18,600 unique visitors at the show. This made Hillhead 2016 one of the biggest ever in the show’s history.

To meet their social media needs, Hillhead chose Status Social, the East Midlands’ only specialist social media consultancy. Our objectives were to raise awareness amongst the target audience in the run up to Hillhead, while directing traffic to the registration page.

Strategy and Results

On Twitter, we reached out to the show’s exhibitors and engaged with their audience. This caused their follower numbers to surge.

During the show’s three day run, Hillhead’s tweets were seen more than 93,000 times, with regular visitor interaction.

We engaged directly with influencers from the quarrying community, many of whom were due to exhibit at Hillhead that year. This meant that Hillhead’s content was shared a large number of times on a daily basis. It was seen then engaged with by the target audience.

In a three month campaign, the Twitter profile and its tweets were viewed collectively over 495,000 times, with more than 1,700 link clicks through to the Hillhead website.

At the same time we managed Hillhead’s LinkedIn profiles. Every day we posted content carefully worded and formatted to suit the LinkedIn audience. In just three months we grew the group members from 43 to 231 people, many of whom were decision makers in the quarrying industry. Our most successful post received 826 views.

The Power of Twitter

Thanks to Twitter, we even managed to help out one of the visitors who didn’t have an umbrella:

Social Media for Events

As a result, exhibitors offered shelter, drinks and umbrellas to the visitor giving them a great opportunity for engagement:

Social Media for Events

Eventually, the visitor was rescued:

Social Media for Events

 

From book festivals to beer festivals, our social media management has helped a huge variety of events to spread the word, engage with their attendees and reach the next level of success.

Get in touch to discuss how we can make your event truly unforgettable!

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Social Media for Gyms – How a Twitter Campaign Boosted Signups by over 60%

Posted by on Aug 24, 2016 in Blog, Case studies | 0 comments

Social Media for Gyms – How a Twitter Campaign Boosted Signups by over 60%

Following our social media for gyms campaign, Derby gyms saw memberships increase by two thirds, with a further 1,500 people showing an interest in joining. Our tweets were seen 250,000 times and shared 595 times. But what was the secret of our success? Read on to find out.

How do you convince someone to join a gym? How can you encourage people to get fit and live a more active life?

Derby City Council wanted to encourage local people to feel healthier.

The new council-owned velodrome, Derby Arena, was nearing completion. What better time to introduce the people of Derby to a range of gym membership deals?

Social Media For Gyms – How to Encourage People to Get Active.

 

We ran a number of social media campaigns for Derby City Council gyms. The aim was to get local people interested in joining their local gym.

In our three month social media for gyms campaign, we:

  • Tweeted seven days a week, tracking down and personally engaging with residents about getting fit and feeling healthy
  • Posted tweets that were written to be retweeted by influential people in the tourism industry
  • Encouraged residents to take a look at the different gym locations on the council website and the membership offer

Our tweets were relevant, engaging, authentic, and targeted. But most important of all, we were consistent. And the results speak for themselves.

Ed Green, audience engagement manager at Derby City Council, said:

We had the traditional marketing sorted. We now wanted to reach people in different ways, including students who we knew would be using social media.

We needed the campaign to be intense and achieve results in a short period of time. This is exactly what Status Social did for us.

 

social media for gyms

 

The Results.

We exceeded all of the key performance indicators for the three month campaign.

Highlights included:

  • Increased awareness of the gym membership, with tweets seen more than 250,000 times and shared 595 times
  • An increase in people wanting to join a gym, with 1,501 clicks to the declaration of interest form on the council website
  • The number of student sign-ups increased by two-thirds on the previous year

We were overwhelmed by the interest – tweets were shared three times more than we’d expected! We couldn’t have done this without help from the experts.

– Ed Green, audience engagement manager at Derby City Council

 

Social Media for Gyms

 

Whether it’s used to significantly boost gym memberships, or to kindle enthusiasm for a book festival, social media is one of the most powerful, versatile, and cost-effective of all marketing tools.

For a free consultation about how social media can help you achieve your business objectives, call us on 01332 776910, or email us.

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Book Festival Social Media Campaign Seen 800,000 Times

Posted by on Aug 9, 2016 in Case studies | 0 comments

Book Festival Social Media Campaign Seen 800,000 Times

The 2016 Derby Book Festival featured celebrities such as Ken Livingstone MP, Captain Corelli’s Mandolin author Louis de Berniѐres, Four Weddings and a Funeral actor Simon Callow, and broadcaster Stuart Maconie. We were approached to run a social media campaign across Twitter and Facebook to promote the Festival.

An Intelligent Social Media Campaign

Status Social ran a successful Facebook and Twitter campaign for the second year running, resulting in a significant boost to website traffic and hundreds of interactions from the public. We also tweeted live from some of the events and ran a low-budget Facebook advertising campaign to help sell tickets for Festival events.

Social media generated 12% of traffic to the Derby Book Festival website during the campaign, with only Google referring more clicks to the site. Ticket sales for the festival increased by 33% on the previous year.

“I would recommend anyone running an event to speak to Status Social.”

– Sian Hoyle, Derby Book Festival Organiser

Rekindling Facebook

One of our biggest challenges was creating a buzz for the festival on a Facebook page that had been practically dormant for seven months. But we quickly generated some traction by developing and implementing a strategy designed to get page posts back into existing and new fans’ newsfeeds.

During the campaign, posts on the Facebook page were seen approximately 386,000 times. The page generated more than 5,500 interactions including likes, comments, and those all-important shares. Many of the posts on the page were aimed at generating engagement to take advantage of Facebook’s EdgeRank algorithm.

Derby Book Festival Social Media Campaign

Huge Gains on Twitter

The Derby Book Festival tweets and Twitter profile were seen more than 450,000 times, with people interacting with nearly every tweet published from the profile. Through posting highly-targeted material, we generated 1,673 retweets, 1,496 likes, and 972 link clicks.

By the close of the Festival, the Twitter account had 2066 followers – a huge rise from the start of the campaign.

Unprecedented Success

Derby Book Festival organiser Sian Hoyle said:

“The ticket sales for this year were beyond our wildest projections and were up by 33% on last year’s sales.  We couldn’t have done it without the help of our marketing partners Status Social, Codemakers and WDA.

“Once again, Status Social demonstrated the impact a well-run social media campaign can have on a festival, helping create the buzz, brand awareness and positive effect on ticket sales.

“I would recommend anyone running an event to speak to Status Social.”

Find out how we can help promote your festival or event through social media! For a free consultation, call us on 01332 776 910, or fill in our online contact form.

Photos by Bonbon Photography.

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How to win a competition using social media

Posted by on Jul 20, 2016 in Case studies | 0 comments

How to win a competition using social media

How do you win competitions using social media? Lacemaker Louise West saw the potential when she asked Status Social to ensure she reached the final of a prestigious business competition in a national magazine.

Louise was up against 200 other UK artists all trying to win the prize – being featured in Craft&Design magazine – yet was at a disadvantage in that some of her competitors had high street shops where they could ask customers to vote for them. Louise works from a studio in Derby in the East Midlands and does most of her work remotely.

Status Social was commissioned to run a Twitter campaign designed to get as many genuine votes as possible for Louise West Lace Design. Two months later, Louise was named as a finalist in the competition, achieving her objective.

So what did we do? We found and individually tweeted more than 200 people who we considered, through social media profiling*, would be likely to vote for Louise. This was backed up by broadcast tweets seen by Louise’s followers which were retweeted 275 times over the 60 days.

Social media management Louise WestThe campaign resulted in 265 clicks through to the Craft&Design voting page, all from people who wanted Louise to win the competition. The voting procedure on the website was quite complicated so voters had to genuinely like Louise’s work to go through all the stages. No incentives were offered.

More than 100 accounts started following @laceyloudesign on Twitter and her tweets were seen nearly 100,000 times during the campaign.

“I called on Status Social to get the message out to more people than I would have otherwise reached, and we used Twitter extensively to reach a huge audience,” said Louise. “Asking for votes for the competition but also to raise the presence of my business on the social media platforms.

“As a result of the campaign, a huge number of people followed and voted for me, which resulted in the finalist award and it just got the message out there to a much bigger audience than I’d previously reached.”

Louise, who has produced work for the National Trust and a European royal family amongst others, said she realised without a social media campaign, her chances of reaching the final of the competition and getting herself featured in the magazine were slim.

Social media management Louise West (4)“I don’t think a lot of people think about what’s involved in being in a competition like that,” she said. “Craft&Design magazine initially approached me to be included in it and then it was a case, I thought, of what can I do to encourage people to vote but also that would subsequently benefit the business long term?

“Status Social found a lot of people that had that appreciation of what I actually do and encouraged them to vote for me.

“I was delighted by the enthusiasm of everyone at Status Social involved in the campaign. Even though they knew nothing of lace at the start, their enthusiasm matched mine in every way and the campaign was very successful because of the enthusiasm that came over in the tweets which reflected my enthusiasm for the subject.”

Would you like to hear how social media could help you achieve your business objectives? Then contact us for a free consultation.

Listen to Louise West tell the story of her social media management campaign in her own words or read the transcript of her interview below:

“I am Louise West Lace Design, I run my own business based at Friar Gate Studios (in Derby, UK). I design, make, and teach hand-made bobbin lace. I’m currently working on a commission for Kedleston Hall to make thirty metres of gold lace.

“At the beginning of the year I was invited to be in the Selected Makers Competition for the national Craft&Design magazine, and the aim was to get into the finalists, to get a mention in the magazine, and numerous other prizes. There were two hundred textile artists in the magazine and I reached the final six, ending up in third place with a finalist award.

“I called on Status Social to help raise a profile in the social media area, to get the message out to more people than I would have otherwise reached, and we used Twitter extensively to reach a huge audience. Asking for votes for the competition but also to raise the presence of my business on the social media platforms.

“Status Social did a lot of activity for me, a lot of tweets with images and they also invited individuals to vote for me in the competition.

“As a result of the campaign, a huge number of people followed and voted for me, which resulted in the finalist award and it just got the message out there to a much bigger audience than I’d previously reached.

Social media management Louise West (9)“I don’t think a lot of people think about what’s involved in being in a competition like that. Craft&Design magazine initially approached me to be included in it and then it was a case, I thought, of what can I do to encourage people to vote but also that would subsequently benefit the business long term? And it was being a fellow tenant of the studios and already knowing how Status Social work; that encouraged me to use them as a business.

“I think one thing that surprised me were the range of other craftspeople that voted for me, for lace making. It’s quite a traditional craft but I have taken it into quite a few contemporary areas as well and it was people who appreciate hand-made crafts and traditional as well as the contemporary. Status Social found a lot of people that had that appreciation of what I actually do and encouraged them to vote for me.

“I was delighted by the enthusiasm of everyone involved in the campaign, even though they knew nothing of lace at the start, their enthusiasm matched mine in every way and it was very successful because of the enthusiasm that came over in the tweets which reflected my enthusiasm for the subject.”

*Social media profiling involves looking at the content users reveal on social media to understand their habits, hobbies, passions, etc.

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